THE ARTS SOCIETY WORCESTER
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DateLecture
08 January 2019A LOAD OF OLD BALLS - CHANGE OF LECTURE
11 December 2018A CORNUCOPIA OF CHRISTMAS
13 November 2018DISCOVERING MACDONALD GILL: ARCHITECT ARTIST AND MAP MAKER
09 October 2018AQUA TRIUMPHALIS:POWER AND PAGEANTRY ON THE THAMES
11 September 2018CELEBRATING THE ROYAL ACADEMY OF ARTS 1768-2018
12 June 2018GOLDEN JUBILEE CELEBRATION - "THE BORGIAS: THE MOST INFAMOUS FAMILY IN HISTORY?"
08 May 2018EDWARD BAWDEN: ARTIST AND ADVENTURER
10 April 2018AS GOOD AS GOLD
13 March 2018AMADEO MODIGLIANI AND BOHEMIAN PARIS
13 February 2018BRISTOL'S BANKSY: STREET ART
09 January 2018"MARS AND THE MUSES"
05 December 2017CHRISTMAS CUSTOMS AND TRADITIONS
14 November 2017THE AGE OF JAZZ: ART DECO FASHION AND STYLE
10 October 2017LOOKING AT PAINTINGS FROM "THE NATURE IN ART" COLLECTION
12 September 2017MILLE MIGLIA
13 June 2017TIBET - THE ROOF OF THE WORLD
09 May 2017THE ART AND MEANING OF MAPS
11 April 2017MAVERICK ARCHITECTS FROM THE 16th CENTURY
14 March 2017THIS IS WREN
14 February 2017ROME, EUR, AND THE ART OF FASCISM IN ITALY
10 January 2017FABER AND FABER - ITS DESIGNS AND HISTORY
13 December 2016SEVEN WONDERS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD
08 November 2016GYPSIES, TRAMPS AND THIEVES
11 October 2016ON CUPBOARDS AND IN DRAWERS
13 September 2016MUSIC AND INSTRUMENTS AT THE TUDOR COURT
11 September 2016lecture times

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A LOAD OF OLD BALLS - CHANGE OF LECTURE SIMON INGLIS Tuesday 08 January 2019

According to historian Barbara Tuchman, the invention of the ball ranks as highly as the invention of the wheel. Simon Inglis agrees, especially after spending years delving into cubbyholes at pavilions and museums, in workshops and factories finding out how these apparently simple objects came into being and how their design and manufacture has evolved. Why are marbles glass? Why did the discovery of gutta percha transform golf? Why were games such as lawn tennis and ping pong made possible only in the mid 19th century? Why did some billiard balls explode, and why are rugby balls such an odd shape? In 1853 oats, lard and dragons blood were listed as ingredients of which balls? Hear the answers to all these questions and more in this fascinating lecture on the history of balls.

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SIMON INGLIS

Writer and historian Simon Inglis specialises in the architecture and heritage of sport and recreation. Although sport and recreation might seem an unlikely subject for The Arts Society, non-sporty types need have no fear. Simon’s themes are architecture, design, heritage and popular culture. Having completed a history degree at University College London, he freelanced for various publications, including the Guardian, Observer and Radio Times. He has curated exhibitions for the Building Centre and the British Council, been a regular contributor to radio and television, has travelled and lectured extensively, and written a number of books